Aug 04, 2021

FIDE World Cup – Kosteniuk is World Cup Champion

Alexandra Kosteniuk is the 2021 FIDE Women’s World Cup Champion after offering a draw in a winning position to clinch victory against Aleksandra Goryachkina. Her feat of winning the title without needing tiebreaks once was a repeat of how she won the Women’s World Championship in 2008, while the 43 rating points she picked up took her back into the women’s Top 10. Elsewhere Sergey Karjakin reached the final and booked a spot in the Candidates after an opening disaster for Vladimir Fedoseev, while Magnus Carlsen and Jan-Krzysztof Duda will play tiebreaks after Duda pressed hard but couldn’t break through.

37-year-old Alexandra Kosteniuk has repeated the knockout triumph she achieved in 2008 as a 24-year-old, when she won the Women’s World Championship title by defeating Atousa Pourkashiyan, Tatiana Kosintseva, Anna Ushenina, Pia Cramling and then Hou Yifan, all without the need for tiebreaks.

Back then Kosteniuk was seeded 9th, while this time she was seeded 14th but also won all her matches without tiebreaks, against Deysi Cori, Pia Cramling (as in 2008!), Mariya Muzychuk, Valentina Gunina, Tan Zhongyi and finally Aleksandra Goryachkina. She talked about what it meant to win such a knockout again.

See also:

  • Official website
  • All the games with computer analysis and commentary on chess24: Open | Women
  • Magnus Carlsen plays the 2021 World Cup
  • FIDE World Cup 2021 pairings are out
  • FIDE World Cup 1.1: The battle begins
  • FIDE World Cup 1.2: 80 players out, 28 tiebreaks
  • FIDE World Cup 1.3: 14-year-old Volodar Murzin scores upset win
  • FIDE World Cup 2.1: Aronian forfeits, Caruana in doubt
  • FIDE World Cup 2.2: Krasenkow shocks Alekseenko
  • FIDE World Cup 2.3: Sindarov knocks out Firouzja
  • FIDE World Cup 3.1: Mamedyarov & Yu among 28 in danger
  • FIDE World Cup 3.2: Caruana is out!
  • FIDE World Cup 3.3: Giri & Mamedyarov join mass exodus
  • FIDE World Cup 4.1: Carlsen slowed, Goryachkina beaten
  • FIDE World Cup 4.2: Hari, Xiong and Pragg knocked out
  • FIDE World Cup 4.3: 18-year-old Ivic knocks out Andreikin
  • FIDE World Cup 5.1: Martirosyan & Kosteniuk strike
  • FIDE World Cup 5.2: Shankland & Vidit in quarterfinals
  • FIDE World Cup 5.3: Carlsen through after Esipenko thriller
  • FIDE World Cup 6.1: Carlsen & Shankland take the lead
  • FIDE World Cup 6.2: It’s a Duda-Carlsen semi-final!
  • FIDE World Cup 6.3: Karjakin ousts Shankland
  • FIDE World Cup 7.1: Kosteniuk close | Duda holds Carlsen
Jul 24, 2021

FIDE World Cup round 4

Harikrishna fought for 115 moves but couldn’t find a way back on Friday against Iran’s Amin Tabatabaei, whose clash with fellow giant killer Haik Martirosyan is the only Last 16 match already determined. Jeffery Xiong was beaten 2:0 by Vidit, while Praggnanandhaa lost a spectacular game to Maxime Vachier-Lagrave. There are no less than eight tiebreaks in the open section, including Carlsen-Wojtaszek, after Magnus failed to wrap up what should have been a crushing win. Top seed Aleksandra Goryachkina hit back on demand to force one of four tiebreaks in the women’s event.

See also:

  • Official website
  • All the games with computer analysis and commentary on chess24: Open | Women
  • Magnus Carlsen plays the 2021 World Cup
  • FIDE World Cup 2021 pairings are out
  • FIDE World Cup 1.1: The battle begins
  • FIDE World Cup 1.2: 80 players out, 28 tiebreaks
  • FIDE World Cup 1.3: 14-year-old Volodar Murzin scores upset win
  • FIDE World Cup 2.1: Aronian forfeits, Caruana in doubt
  • FIDE World Cup 2.2: Krasenkow shocks Alekseenko
  • FIDE World Cup 2.3: Sindarov knocks out Firouzja
  • FIDE World Cup 3.1: Mamedyarov & Yu among 28 in danger
  • FIDE World Cup 3.2: Caruana is out!
  • FIDE World Cup 3.3: Giri & Mamedyarov join mass exodus
  • FIDE World Cup 4.1: Carlsen slowed, Goryachkina beaten
Jul 16, 2021

FIDE World Cup round 2

Magnus Carlsen looked sharp as he got off to a winning start against birthday boy Sasa Martinovic on Thursday when the big guns joined the FIDE World Cup, but the chess was overshadowed by turmoil caused by COVID-19. Levon Aronian was forced to forfeit against Bobby Cheng, while Fabiano Caruana’s game against Indonesian GM Susanto Megaranto was suddenly stopped midway when test results came back showing Susanto was infected. Fabiano got a win by default, but faces more tests himself.

Round 2 marked the point at which the top 50 seeds in the Open and the top 25 seeds in the Women’s event joined the action, and, given the complexity of travel during the pandemic, it was impressive that there was just one game out of 96 that didn’t start on Thursday. It was a big one, however, with world no. 5 and 2-time World Cup winner Levon Aronian forced to forfeit a game against 24-year-old 2552-rated Australian GM Bobby Cheng. The official communication from FIDE was oddly worded.

See also:

  • Official website
  • All the games with computer analysis and commentary on chess24: Open | Women
  • Magnus Carlsen plays the 2021 World Cup
  • FIDE World Cup 2021 pairings are out
  • FIDE World Cup 1.1: The battle begins
  • FIDE World Cup 1.2: 80 players out, 28 tiebreaks
  • FIDE World Cup 1.3: 14-year-old Volodar Murzin scores upset win
Jul 15, 2021

FIDE World Cup

14-year-old IM Volodar Murzin looked shocked, then thrilled, then determined as he checkmated 44-year-old Viorel Iordachescu to qualify for a Round 2 clash with fellow Russian Vladislav Artemiev. The FIDE World Cup Round 1 tiebreaks largely saw the favourites win, but English IM Ravi Haria convincingly outplayed Russian GM Vadim Zvjaginsev, while Egyptian no. 9 Abdelrahman Hesham beat Egyptian no. 2 Ahmed Adly. Magnus Carlsen, Fabiano Caruana, Aleksandra Goryachkina and all the other top seeds now join the event.

19 matches went to tiebreaks in the Open Section on Wednesday, with the stakes high — it was not just about the chance to play some of the world’s best players, but that Round 2 losers take home $6,000. The format for the tiebreaks is the same as in previous World Cups, with two 25-minute + 30-second increment rapid games follow by pairs of games at increasingly fast time controls, until a potential Armageddon game. Let’s take a look at how the matches went.

25 min + 30 sec: 14 matches completed

  1. GM Evgeny Alekseev 2.5:1.5 GM Adham Fawzy (EGY), plays Radoslav Wojtaszek in Round 2
  2. GM Hjorvar Gretarsson (ISL) 2.5:1.5 GM Kirill Stupak (BLR), plays Maxim Matlakov
  3. GM Gukesh D (IND) 2.5:1.5 GM Pawel Tecla, plays Daniil Dubov
  4. IM Ravi Haria (ENG) 3:1 GM Vadim Zvjaginsev, plays Etienne Bacrot
  5. GM Hovhannes Gabuzyan (ARM) 3:1 GM Bilel Bellahcene (ALG), plays Bassem Amin
  6. GM Benjamin Bok (NED) 3:1 IM Asyl Abdyjapar (KGZ), plays Samuel Sevian
  7. GM Varuzhan Akobian (USA) 2.5:1.5 IM Esteban Alb Valderrama Quiceno (COL), plays Nils Grandelius
  8. GM Boris Savchenko (RUS) 2.5:1.5 GM Nikita Afanasiev (RUS), plays Anish Giri
  9. GM Bobby Cheng (AUS) 3:1 GM Vahap Sanal (TUR), plays Levon Aronian
  10. GM Abdelrahman Hesham (EGY) 2.5:1.5 GM Ahmed Adly (EGY), plays Constantin Lupulescu
  11. GM M.amin Tabatabaei (IRI) 2.5:1.5 IM Basheer Al Qudaimi (YEM), plays Ferenc Berkes
  12. GM Haik Martirosyan (ARM) 3:1 IM Chitumbo Mwali (ZMB), plays Mustafa Yilmaz
  13. GM Krikor Sevag Mekhitarian (BRA) 2.5:1.5 GM Juan Carlos Gonzalez Zamora, plays Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
  14. GM Susanto Megaranto (IDN) 2.5:1.5 GM Ehsan Ghaem Maghami (IRI), plays Fabiano Caruana

The clear favourites such as Benjamin Bok, Varuzhan Akobian and Haik Martirosyan largely took over in tiebreaks.

See also:

  • Official website
  • All the games with computer analysis and commentary on chess24: Open | Women
  • Magnus Carlsen plays the 2021 World Cup
  • FIDE World Cup 2021 pairings are out
  • FIDE World Cup 1.1: The battle begins
  • FIDE World Cup 1.2: 80 players out, 28 tiebreaks
Jun 11, 2021

Magnus Carlsen plays the 2021 World Cup

World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen will play the FIDE World Cup that starts in Sochi, Russia on July 12th, though as one of the Top 50 seeds he’ll join from Round 2 on July 15th. The tournament will be played in the Galaktika Centre in Krasnaya Polana | photo: FIDE. Magnus last played in the 2017 World Cup, when he overpressed and got knocked out by Bu Xiangzhi in Round 3. Although Ian Nepomniachtchi and Wesley So have declined invitations the rest of the world Top 10, including world no. 2 Fabiano Caruana, defending champion Teimour Radjabov and losing finalist Ding Liren, are all set to play.

 

 

There are two spots in the 2022 Candidates Tournament available to the finalists of the FIDE World Cup, but of course that’s nothing that Magnus Carlsen needs to worry about. Others have objected, just as they did, for instance, when Magnus and Fabiano Caruana both played the 2019 FIDE Grand Swiss.

Hikaru Nakamura and Anish Giri discussed that topic on Hikaru’s Twitch channel recently and reflected that the FIDE Grand Prix was likely to become the main way for the top players to try and qualify for the Candidates – since its limited field and multiple events reduces the element of randomness, while already qualified players, such as Magnus Carlsen or whoever has qualified before Spring 2022, will be excluded.

In Sochi, the World Champion can target the $110,000 top prize, as well as getting some practice playing classical over-the-board chess in the run-up to the World Championship match against Ian Nepomniachtchi in Dubai in November.

There’s also the sheer challenge – the World Cup is a rare event that Magnus has never won. As a 15-year-old he was beaten in the Last 16 by Evgeny Bareev in 2005, and two years later he lost to Gata Kamsky in the semi-finals. Then there was a decade-long break before, already the World Champion, he crashed out to Bu Xiangzhi in Round 3 of the 2017 World Cup in Tbilisi.

Magnus, who played his 2014 World Championship match against Vishy Anand in Sochi, is no stranger to the area.

Round 1 begins on Monday, July 12th, with 156 players competing in 78 matches. A classical game will be played on each of the first two days, and, if tied, the players come back for tiebreaks on the third. The tiebreaks are first two 25+10 games, then, if needed, two 10+10, then two 5+3, and then finally an Armageddon game. One twist this time round is that the final and 3rd place matches also consist of only two classical games, not the previous four.

The other twist is that the big guns, the Top 50 seeds, only join from Round 2, which with 128 players and 64 matches is equivalent to Round 1 of previous World Cups. That’s when Magnus will join the party.

Who’s playing? Actually, it’s easier to say who isn’t, with the following qualifiers not taking part:

  • Ian Nepomniachtchi (replaced by Harikrishna)
  • Wesley So (replaced by Vidit)
  • Richard Rapport (replaced by Alexander Areschenko)
  • Wang Hao (replaced by Bu Xiangzhi)
  • Viswanathan Anand (replaced by Wei Yi)
  • Evgeny Shtembuliak (the U20 World Champion – replaced by Zoltan Almasi)
  • Ju Wenjun (replaced by Dmitry Jakovenko)

As you can tell, it’s an incredibly strong line-up. At stake is an almost $1.9 million prize fund, while the gruelling tournament will only definitely be over by August 6th, the day on which we could potentially get tiebreaks in the final matches. Alongside the open event there will also be the Women’s World Cup with 103 players. Hou Yifan and Humpy Konery don’t play, but Women’s World Champion Ju Wenjun does.

The pairings were due to be announced today, but with federations struggling to confirm participants the regulations were changed to allow the pairings to be published 20 days rather than a month before the event begins. We may well see more players drop out with the pandemic complicating travel everywhere, but it’s sure to an enthralling month of chess!

See also:

Oct 04, 2019

For the FIDE World Cup title and $110,000 top prize

Ding Liren and Teimour Radjabov will play tiebreaks on Friday for the FIDE World Cup title and $110,000 top prize after their final classical game ended in a cagey draw. Magnus Carlsen and Peter Svidler are set to join Jan Gustafsson to commentate on that battle here on chess24, and they’ll also be able to kibitz MVL-Yu Yangyi, after a 4th draw in the 3rd place match. “I don’t really care anymore!” was Maxime’s half-joke when asked for a prediction of how it would go, with all the players ready to end their month in Siberia.

Thoughts, of course, turned immediately to tiebreaks, with $30,000 at stake – the difference between $110,000 and $80,000 – and of course a piece of chess history in winning one of the toughest events in chess. How are they feeling in advance? Well, Radjabov felt that by this stage you can’t expect too much of the players:
Already I don’t know which kind of games are suitable for us, but maybe bullet – we would play like 100 games to decide. Or Fischer Random or something – 10 games maybe would be fine and fun as well! It’s a normal thing, especially here, so just generally also we’ll try to rest and play the match tomorrow.

For chess fans it should be great fun, and to help ensure that we have Jan Gustafsson commentating with some high-powered help! At the moment the plan is to have 8-time Russian Champion Peter Svidler commentating on the first rapid game and then a certain World Champion Magnus Carlsen commentating on the second. After that we’ll see what happens… Tune into all the World Cup action for one last time live here on chess24 from 12:00 CEST!

See also:

  • Official website
  • All the 2019 World Cup games with computer analysis on chess24
  • Khanty World Cup 1.1: Rise of the teen stars
  • Khanty World Cup 1.2: A Svidler masterpiece
  • Khanty World Cup Round 1 Tiebreaks: Shankland & Adams out
  • Khanty World Cup 2.1: Nakamura and Wei Yi lose
  • Khanty World Cup 2.2: Naka out as Firouzja stars
  • Khanty World Cup Round 2 Tiebreaks: Giri survives Armageddon
  • Khanty World Cup 3.1: Seven on the brink
  • Khanty World Cup 3.2: No way back
  • Khanty World Cup Round 3 Tiebreaks: Xiong knocks out Giri
  • Khanty World Cup 4.1: A bad day for the USA
  • Khanty World Cup 4.2: So, Svidler and Nepo out
  • Khanty World Cup Round 4 Tiebreaks: Xiong wins thriller
  • Khanty World Cup QF 1: Who wants to win an exchange?
  • Khanty World Cup QF 2: Ding & Radjabov reach semifinals
  • Khanty World Cup QF Tiebreaks: Aronian & Vitiugov crash out
  • Khanty World Cup SF: Radjabov crushes MVL’s dream
  • Khanty World Cup SF Tiebreaks: Ding Liren does it again
  • Khanty World Cup Final 1: A normal day
  • Khanty World Cup Final 2: Ding Liren strikes
Jul 25, 2017

Magnus Carlsen will be playing the FIDE World Cup in September in Georgia

It’s almost unprecedented that a reigning world champion is participating in a cycle for the next world championship, but this year it will happen. Magnus Carlsen will be playing the FIDE World Cup in September in Tbilisi, Georgia.

It was FIDE itself that broke the news on Monday morning, by publishing the full list of participants of this year’s FIDE World Cup. (See below). As it turns out, the top 15 of the July FIDE rating list is playing—which, in a broad sense, makes it the strongest chess tournament ever held.

“FIDE is delighted to confirm that the top 15 players in the latest rating list are participating in the World Cup and particularly that the world champion, Magnus Carlsen, has agreed to participate,” FIDE Executive Director Nigel Freeman told Chess.com.

Zurab Azmaiparashvili, the Director of the Organising Committee, is equally thrilled: “To be honest I know about it more than ten days, but anyway I’m really surprised positively! I don’t know if it happened for the first time or not that a world champion will play the World Cup, but for us Georgians, it’s great! We will have Magnus here in Tbilisi and our chess lovers will see him live.”

The FIDE World Cup takes place 2-27 September in Tbilisi, Georgia. The total prize fund is $1.6 million (€1.37 million) with a first prize of $120,000 (€103,000).

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